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Davis, Legislators, Voters have blood on their hands (english)
by B. Cayenne Bird 10:07pm Thu Jan 11 '01
address: P.O. Box 22765, Sacramento, Ca. 95822 rightor1@aol.com

medical crisis in California resulted in 39 deaths Nov 1 through Dec 12, six of those were at Chowchilla's C.C.W.F.
Davis, Legislators, Voters
have blood on their hands...
by B. Cayenne Bird, Director

http://www.geocities.com/capitolhill/parliament/2398/home.html

Stephanie Hardie, a 33-year-old Pomona mother of two, sent to prison for overdrawing her own checking account is finally free from the talons of the California Criminal Justice System. She's dead.

Did this sudden and senseless death really benefit or protect the citizens of California ? The heartbreaking answer could only be "no."

Hardie had complained of chest pains and sought help at the prison medical clinic three times in the two weeks preceding her death on DEC 9. The "clinic" at California Correctional Facility for Women at Chowchilla (CCWF) is classified as a Skilled Nursing Facility where six young inmates died between Nov 1 and Dec. 12. Hardie was the fifth.

Any barely trained medical professional would have suspected the heart as the problem. Normally, an EKG and a chest x-ray would be ordered for chest pains and the patient hospitalized until the results were analyzed.

Instead Hardie was given a "breathing treatment" and offered Pepto-Bismol and Motrin. She was asked for a $5 Co-payment and turned away from proper diagnosis TWICE by MTA's, a hybrid guard-nurse combination which is equivalent to a Licensed Vocational Nurse with a nightstick. The physician did not order these basic tests even with a familial history of heart disease. Why not?

The answer is most likely to save money, which is barely available for the health and dental care of California's 160,000 inmates.

Eye witnesses tell a gruesome tale of how they all screamed for help for about seven minutes to summon a guard while Hardie lay bleeding profusely. One of her cellmates gave CPR. Finally, two guards opened the door, took one look at Stephanie and instead of summoning help by radio, ran away and left her!

Frightened cellmates kept the CPR in progress, blood and all. It was 15-20 minutes before the guards returned to load her into a van WITH NO EMERGENCY EQUIPMENT. She was transported to what they term a "prison medical clinic." Only two of the State's prison hospitals are licensed according to a State Auditor's Report January 2000 on Managed Care. These clinics do not meet regular hospital standards.

No one ever saw a defibrillator, a shock device key to treating heart attacks and so common that almost every airplane has one on board. If C.C.W.F. even owns one of these basic pieces of emergency equipment it was never used on Hardie. On the weekends, no doctors are present to handle problems of 3200 women, the size of a small city.

An ambulance would only be called if the inmates could afford to pay for it and few of them could at salaries of 18 cents or less an hour. We have reports of ambulances arriving in one to two hours at most prisons because they are remotely located. Few take issue with the shoddy emergency response methods.

Hardie's relatively minor offenses resulted in capital punishment for her and a lifetime of hurt for her surviving mother Diane Hardie-Rios, a juvenile probations officer in Pomona. I question what she was doing in prison in the first place.

Her grandmother feels she was a victim of vindictive sentencing because she cried out during her trial that would separate her for ten years from her children who were then 8 and 10 years old. She had five years of her sentence left.

Through all the pain of Stephanie's sudden and suspicious death, her mother and members of the UNION had to literally fight for the release of her body. We notified several senators, acting CDC Director Steve Cambra, Det. Metcalf of the Madera County Coroner's Office, 31 news agencies to name a few that we wanted the evidence preserved and an independent autopsy performed at 8 a.m. Monday morning.

But Det. Metcalf steamrollered us all embalming her body and washing her hair before we could send in an independent pathologist. Metcalf knew the family's wishes but he ignored everyone. After embalming, the autopsy was adversely affected and a toxicology report was impossible for anyone to get.

Our lack of funds magnified the problem, and this working mother just trying to bury her daughter went through a living hell for 13 days, looking for a lawyer, facing large and sudden expenses.

We are all aghast at the sequence of events, at the callousness of the public and officials to help the families of all the dead inmates. This holocaust is worse than the death toll of any riot. Three more have died since Hardie, seventeen so far this year.

***********

On the same day that Hardie died, Jack Kryder, a visitor on his way out of C.C.W.F. fell onto the grass. Another visitor pleaded with the guard that he could administer CPR to Kryder until help arrived. But the untrained guard forced everyone back into the visiting room according to witnesses.

Horrified men, women and children who were out for a pleasant Saturday visit watched Jack Kryder twitch and writhe with no help for a full 38 minutes - too late to save his life. Imagine the torment of the good-byes said that day when families saw the vivid reality of the prison's lack of emergency medical services.

The correlation between a civilian visitor and an inmate receiving no emergency treatment and dying on the same day ought to be recognized. Both instances were witnessed by many -some regular citizens and guards, not just inmates. At least this time, the State cannot so easily deny the crisis.

Official records show 39 people dead from Nov 1 through DEC 12 in California's State prisons.

Not all of these deaths could be construed as suspicious. After observing the lack of qualified personnel and equipment, repeatedly hearing the inhumane practices accepted as business as usual by callous legislators led by Gov. Davis, I can only conclude that not everything possible was done to relieve pain or to save these people, even if some did die from natural causes. This strong statement is based on nearly three years of handling member complaints on a daily basis. It's a nightmare. Diagnosis and surgeries IF performed take many months, even years.

There were six inmates and one visitor who died Nov 1 through Dec. 12 at Chowchilla alone. Three more have died since. Does it only matter to media and officials when deaths are clustered in this manner? Three of those deaths are under investigation by a medical team sent in from UC Davis. From what we've witnessed, ALL of the cases should be thoroughly investigated.

Susann Steinberg, Director of CDC Healthcare Services has issued 160,000 letters to inmates advising them to suspect legal and illegal drugs. How are they supposed to monitor the safety of drugs given to them by prescription? People in prison are at their bungling mercy.

Wouldn't the mailer money have been better spent on teaching guards how to administer CPR or at the very least acquiring a defibrillator (which may be in a back room some place because no one can use it). Covering up, making excuses always seems to be important than remedy. It's time for some answers and for the people of California to demand a reduction in the prison population and revision to overly harsh laws.

At some point, it would have been the right thing to do to notify the public that the harsh laws had resulted in too many people in prison, more than can be cared for within the budget allocated by Davis and the legislators. Nobody had the guts and stood by quietly while prisoners are suffering and dying everyday.

Already inmates who witnessed the death of Hardie are being pressured not to testify. Correctional Officer London who sent Hardie to the clinic twice is not showing up for work at the prison. Is she hiding?

We weren't the only ones alerting the public to the medical crisis. Senator John Vasconcellos stated at almost every Senate Public Safety Committee held for the past four years that people were being released from prisons sicker than before they were incarcerated, both mentally and physically. Senators Richard Polanco Vasconcellos and Hayden proposed many bills trying to put the Correction part of Corrections into healing programs. Republican legislators beat most of these down. The medical doctors in CDC Health Care services pleaded for more budgets to be able to meet basic needs of a burgeoning prison population.

Gray Davis vetoed most of these bills and budget requests even though millions of dollars in lawsuit payouts continually drain the taxpayers. Lawsuit payouts for prison guard brutality, medical neglect, and civil rights violations of prisoners are hidden and spread across several budgets. It appears there are more than 5000 lawsuits a year, but since Wilson, it is almost impossible to pry loose the exact figure of settlements.

Pay now or pay later the taxpayers are paying for all this inhumane, unbearable incompetence. Legislators can't and won't do the right thing up front because of groups such as CCPOA and Crime Victims who stop everything to benefit prisoners, even though healing programs would ultimately lower crime. Such groups finance election campaigns. Prisoners have failed to produce a lobby of their own due to ignorance and poverty. They don't count in Sacramento.

Reporters are banned from the prisons, the public cannot scrutinize what is happening right under our noses which is destroying thousands of families connected to inmates.

Lawyers saw the injustice of the trial which acquitted the Corcoran guards for murder, neglect and brutality, although more trials are coming up. They advise us the juries are mostly all employees of the human bondage industry. They say the Republicans protect all the oppressors in court and are whipped before they start in most cases. Johnny Cochran won't take prison medical neglect cases, nor will most other lawyers.

The families of prisoners are also the innocent victims of crime. We must immediately halt the conveyor belts feeding men and women into a system which cannot care for them by ending the Three Strikes Law, Mandatory Minimum Laws, enforcing parole laws, instituting Prop 36 and release those terminally ill prisoners and the mentally ill into hospitals.

None of this inhumanity is a solution to crime and it's a disgrace that no one should tolerate.

United for No Injustice, Oppression or Neglect (U.N.I.O.N.) has alerted legislators and the public to a widespread medical crisis in prisons on a daily basis since July, 1998. Timeline and actions:

Aug, September, 1998

The UNION families picketed the Capitol to support Corcoran Senate hearings. Director B. Cayenne Bird wrote numerous press releases and appeared on at least 20 television and radio broadcasts alerting the public of prison guard brutality and medical neglect.

November - January, 1999

As a result of UNION's repeated reports of the crisis supporting the work of Senator John Vasconcellos, Davis created the Office of the Inspector General and ombudsmen to investigate inmate complaints.

January 6, 1999

Medical neglect exposed on statewide television before the Rules Committee. Senator John Burton appointed a legislative rep to handle UNION member complaints.

January 2000

Ombudsmen are finally responding to complaints which have been pending for more than a year. There is some remedy. State Auditor publishes report on Managed Care which admits medical problems. http://www.bsa.ca.gov/bsa/since93.html.

June 21, 2000

A five hour meeting is held between State Officials and the UNION to discuss the medical crisis. Lack of money and qualified personnel are the reasons given for medical deficiencies by CDC Medical Healthcare and other officials.

September 29, 2000

At least 30 articles and letters in other newspapers written by UNION director B. Cayenne Bird and members frantically appeal for help with the medical crisis. The speeches, articles, broadcast were relentless since July, 1998.

September, 2000

Federal lawsuit alleging medical neglect at CCWF Chowchilla thrown out due to "lack of evidence."

October ll and 12

Senator Polanco invites the media to hear testimony of medical abuse, neglect and guard brutality at CCWF Chowchilla and CIF, Frontera.

November 7

CDC Director Cal Terhune re-retires, no new director is appointed. Acting Director Steve Cambra tries to fill in

November 1 - Dec. 12

Six inmates and one visitor are dead at CCWF Chowchilla, 39 are dead statewide.

January 17

Senator Polanco has called for a hearing. Meanwhile three other inmates have died at Chowchilla

http://www.geocities.com/capitolhill/parliament/2398/home.html

-30-

Coffey had a heart attack with no hospitalization, no tests, no emergency equipment and l/2 hour for any Guard to even reply to inmate screams for help. This is a pattern, no one is safe. The media needs to care. Every mother and grandmother should tremble in their beds for what apathy and silence is allowing in the name of justice right under our noses.

B. Cayenne Bird

http://www.geocities.com/capitolhill/parliament/2398/home.html

add your own comments


 
Prisoners of USA War on Crime, War on Drugs (english)
by Judy Reinhold 2:17pm Sun Jan 14 '01
address: 907 12th St., #3, Santa Monica, CA 90403 judyreinhold@hotmail.com

The Geneva Convention (Convention III of 12 August 1949) relative to the treatment of prisoners of war states: “Under all circumstances, prisoners of war will receive any medical care they may need and will preferably be treated by medical personnel of the Power on which they depend and, if possible, of their nationality.” Evidently the U.S. Government does not treat its own ‘prisoners of war’ accordingly, having waged its "War on Crime" and "War on Drugs" on its own citizens.

The denial of adequate medical care for prisoners is being exposed as standard practice and we cannot ignore these inhumane conditions any longer. At the rate California is incarcerating people it won't be long before someone YOU know is behind bars. Wake up, Californians!

add your own comments


 
International viewpoint on California prison (english)
by Mrs. Stanley 4:04pm Sun Jan 14 '01

------------------------------------

Dear Editor:

I am writing to you today from Ottawa, Canada to express my grave concerns about the conditions in California's prisons where 39 people, including one visitor, have died since November 1 .

Many of these deaths have likely occurred due to lack of proper medical attention. All prisoners receive little or no health care that is nowhere near the standards available to other citizens.

As an international observer, I urge all California citizens to write to their political representatives demanding full investigation by outside agencies, ie not the prisons themselves, into the deaths and the ongoing health care crisis which affects over 150,000 prisoners and their families. Let me assure you that when planning a holiday, my destination would never be the USA which to me is the most uncivilized country in the world.

Sincerely,

Mrs. J. Stanley

add your own comments


 
Christ was an abused prisoner (english)
by Richard Till 4:53pm Sun Jan 14 '01
legislator160000@aol.com


Dear Editor:

The shocking op-ed penned by B. Cayenne Bird about medical
neglect and the needless death of the young Pomona mother,
Stephanie Hardie,
should make us pause for at least a moment.

Christ was a prisoner who was made to carry a heavy cross.
He was flogged, beaten, humiliated, stakes were pounded through his
wrists, and his heart pierced with a sword.

We have made no progress in handling crime since the dark ages.
I wonder if the media of the day
thought writing about prisoner abuse such as that bestowed upon Christ
was important. We call ourselves Christians and allow others to
be treated inhumanely?
Richard Till

add your own comments


 
Prisoners return home sicker-not better (english)
by Joanne Galvan 5:02pm Sun Jan 14 '01
galvanjoanne@hotmail.com

Dear Editor:

The article by B. Cayenne Bird and prison medical neglect makes me ashamed to be a Californian. Over the years I have read countless reports of a person owning too many dogs or cats and going to prison for not taking care of them. Those in Sacramento responsible for this medical neglect should serve jail time for crimes against humanity.It makes sense that prisoners should return to their communities, healthier -not sicker mentally and physically. Davis should be recalled for ignoring the alerts that resulted in these deaths. I am outraged that people will work for a system which routinely murders young people through medical neglect.

Davis should be ex-Communicated from the Catholic church for all the various forms of murder he perpetuates.
Joanne Galvan

add your own comments


 
California Prisons Medical Neglect (english)
by Sharon Kidcote 5:18pm Sun Jan 14 '01
address: 25393 Via Palacio Santa Clarita, CA USA phone: 661 255 6139 Winkapeep4@cs.com

Dear Sirs: January 14, 2001

California does have laws concerning at least minimal prisoner care. They rarely get it. Many guards do not even know CPR -- an easy skill to learn and one that everyone should know! It is time for reform and it is time to challenge our elected officials. And, please! No more prison administration denials implying that inmates fabricate medical neglect stories "because they have an axe to grind." These are facts, not isolated or unusual incidents.

As preposterous as it may seem, these sorts of things happen daily. Putting sunlight on these events is a responsible act. I would like to thank B. Cayenne Bird for her news articles on medical neglect in our California prison system. Because of her efforts, I am now a member of UNION and I urge all who care about "man's inhumanity to man" to learn how you can bring common sense change to the management of our prisons and to a population that has long been ignored.

Sincerely,

Sharon Kidcote
Santa Clarita, CA USA

add your own comments


 
Medical Negelect is not part of the sentence (english)
by Charles Wesley 5:35pm Sun Jan 14 '01
address: 14142 roscoe blvd #1 Panorama City, CA 91402 phone: 818-893-6046 billwesley63@yahoo.com

Dear Editor

The death of Stephanie Hardie(prisoner) and Jack Kryder a visitor is tragic. From personal experience I know that this is all too common within the California Prison System. The denial of adequate medical care is standard practice. Most doctors that I met with dispense the same medication for whatever ails you, you would receive Motrin for back pain or severe chest pains such as Stephanie Hardie, follow up care can take weeks.

I have witnessed an Officer injured and a helicopter arrive within 7 mins to transport him, yet Mr. Kryder waited 38 minutes and died. We can not ignore these inhumane conditions any longer, at the rate California is incarcerating people it won't be long before someone you know is behind bars. We must all pay the price of incarceration if we break the Law. But, Medical Neglect is not part of the sentence.

Charles Wesley

add your own comments


 
Medical negelect is not part of the sentence (english)
by Charles Wesley 5:43pm Sun Jan 14 '01
address: 14142 Roscoe Blvd. #1 Panorama City Ca 91402 phone: 818-893-6046 billwesley63@yahoo.com

I am sending another story suggestion

add your own comments


 
California Prison Medical Neglect (english)
by Sharon Kidcote 6:44pm Sun Jan 14 '01

Dear Sirs: January 14, 2001

California does have laws concerning at least minimal prisoner care. They rarely get it. Many guards do not even know CPR -- an easy skill to learn and one that everyone should know. It is time for reform and it is time to challenge our elected officials. And, please! No more prison administration denials implying that inmates fabricate medical neglect stories "because they have an axe to grind." These are facts, not isolated or unusual incidents.

As preposterous as it may seem, these sorts of things happen in our prisons daily. Putting sunlight on these events is a responsible act. I would like to thank B. Cayenne Bird for her efforts to correct the medical neglect situaton in California. Because of her efforts, I am now a member of UNION and I urge all who care about "man's inhumanity to man" to learn how to bring common sense change to the management of our prisons and to a population that has long been ignored.

Sincerely,

Sharon Kidcote
Santa Clarita, CA USA

add your own comments


 
Inmates are human too. (english)
by G. Brooks 8:54pm Sun Jan 14 '01

Dear Editor,

I loved the article by B. Cayenne Bird. Don't get me wrong, I believe a person should pay for his misdeeds, but I also believe they should not be treated as less than human. Some of the ways these inmates are treated are inhumane. We would be in prison for treating animals with more care. Should a person that is serving time for their crime have to fear for their life just because they made a poor choice. Some of these inmates are just barely adults that realize the error of their ways and want to make good of their life.

add your own comments


 
What is a "Life Sentence" (english)
by R. Liberty 8:58pm Sun Jan 14 '01
justaeagle@imgospelchip.org

Dear Editor,

Thank you for the article by B. Cayenne Bird. Some of these inmates should not even be serving time. There is a difference between a true "life" sentence and an indeterminate sentence. True "life" sentences are "life without parole".

These people were sentenced to remain in prison for the rest of their natural life. Indeterminate sentences are "15-life", "25-life", etc. The "life" term is there to give the system the "ability" to keep an inmate that is not suitable for release locked up. It is NOT there to keep those who are not a threat to society. Just the same as a 10-25 year sentence says "keep them for 10 years and release them" unless there is reason not to, then keep them locked up for the full 25 years.

add your own comments


 
Poor Choices, No Hope? (english)
by Regina Brooks 9:04pm Sun Jan 14 '01
address: California rbrooks@socal.rr.com

Dear Editor,

I would like to thank your paper for publishing the news article written by B. Cayenne Bird . I used to think all prisoners deserved what they got. I had the same "lock them up and throw away the key" attitude that we hear voiced by Gov. Davis and many others.

There are many inmates that will be in prison for several years or even life and are no more guilty than you or I. Sometimes it is "jury tampering". Sometimes it is corrupt cops. Sometimes it is just poor choices. I used to think that these were just an excuse to get out of a crime. But now I understand that misleading a jury or tampering with a jury can be the difference between a five to ten year sentence and a life sentence.

A person that should have served his time in five years may be doomed to spend the rest of his life behind bars because a jury was misinformed. Should these people be treated as animals? For that matter should any person be treated as less than human.

home.socal.rr.com/justaeagle

add your own comments


 
Re: Medical Neglect in CA Prisons by C. Bird (english)
by Deborah Jimenez 10:02pm Sun Jan 14 '01
jimenezdeborah@yahoo.com

Dear Editor:

The op-ed piece you ran on poor medical care in state prison (by B. Cayenne Bird) pries the lid off a little-considered world.

I live in the largest city in my county, but all of its inhabitants equal only 4/5 of California's prison population (160,000). Here we have three hospitals, among many other medical facilities. The phone book lists pages of doctors; nurses and therapists abound.

What would it be like to live in a subdivision which had little access to these facilities, where many of the neighbors had mental or addiction problems, and where you were surrounded by armed guards? In prison the neighbors and the guards may go with the territory, but inadequate medical care should not.

Deborah D. Jimenez, Santa Rosa, CA

add your own comments


 
Privatized Prisons are Wrong (english)
by Lee Boek 2:27am Mon Jan 15 '01
beknik@pacbell.net

The day that the California Prisons fell into the hands of private enterprise is the day that prison conditions and accountability began to fall away. California once had a prison system that was actually self sufficient in many areas. There were prison facilities that actually raised the food and supplied the milk. Inmates worked and the goal was the rehabilitation of as many inmates as possible. It wasn't perfect but it didn't leave the state with it's governor focused more on fund raising from the gaurd's union than on running a just system and California led the nation in its criminal justice system.

One wonders when legislators will realize that turning prisons into a business has a self fulfilling element that demands more fodder for the burgeoning business of incarceration. We the people are that potential fodder.

add your own comments


 
California's Shame (english)
by Marlene Suttles 3:31pm Mon Jan 15 '01
Beeroyal@aol.com


January 10, 2001

Dear Editor,

We have a situation in our state that continually distresses me to hear and
read about. It concerns the lack of medical care and the continuing lack of compassion
that the system has for the mentally handicapped and the incarcerated people in
our state prison system. There is also a rampart lack of medical attention not
being given to any of these people too. They are dying because of CDC's neglect. It appears that not only are the prisoners being neglected but because a great majority of guards are not trained in CPR and don't have very much compassion for humanity, a
visitor died of an apparent heart attack while frustrated visitors watched helplessly. No one was even allowed to go out and try to help the man. What a sad state of affairs. What does it take to change this situation? Possibly a celebrity or
a politicians family member has to be on the non receiving end of this problem. God help us all.
A very concerned citizen,

Marlene Suttles
Novato,CA 94945

add your own comments


 
Tell Me Why (english)
by Susan Davis 7:43pm Mon Jan 15 '01
address: 1277 Belridge Street # 7-B Oceano, CA 93445 phone: (805) 474-9334 Suseryyz@aol.com

Dear Editor:

I am responding to recent articles about the medical neglect and abuse in California's
prisons and County jails.

Can anyone tell me why there is no substantial medical treatment for the seriously ill in our prisons and jails?
Can anyone tell me why another human being could turn their back on the dying?
Can anyone tell me why our society would rather turn the other cheek, throw all of the misfortunate in prison and jail and then condone the abuse and lack of medical care?
Can anyone tell me why we all stand by and watch as the helpless die a slow and agonizing death?
Can anyone tell me why we lost our hearts and our souls?
Can anyone tell me why we all continue to pay for it?
Tell me why...........

Susan Davis
Oceano, CA 93445

add your own comments


 
God's Shoes???? (english)
by Bonnie/Jim 9:59am Tue Jan 16 '01
bbonnieblue@aol.com

Who said the DOC could step into God's shoes? It doesn't matter if you're a killer or a petty thief or even innocent. If you land behind bars,know for a fact you will be starved,beaten,raped,tortured and possibly killed by Calif. DOC. If you are sick in mind or body be assured you'll get sicker and most likly die in the filth and stench. A place where its a premium to receive a aspirin.Does Calif. have a unusually ignorant, uncaring population?Of Course not.....But why do they turn there heads and join the rest of the world in allowing Hitlers rules to govern our prison system?Why do they elect government officials who "get off" on human torture.Why is this allowed to happen in a supposedly christian nation? If you've done the crime, do the reasonable time. But the judge did not add,medical neglect and inhuman living conditions to anyones sentence. This must stop now.God's fury will be like no other when he discovers who borrowed his shoes.........

add your own comments


 
God Forgive Us (english)
by Linda 3:15pm Tue Jan 16 '01
LChian@aol.com

The conditions that these men and women have to endure are atrocious beyond words. There is no reason why a country that considers itself to be civilized should allow neglect such as this to go on. One day the majority of these people should be returning to the streets. Is this neglect a way to make sure they do not? I am sick that those in control allow such things to go on as business as usual. I can only ask that God forgive us because ultimately we the citizens are responsible because we allow these tortures to continue. Gov. Davis, you should hang your head in shame.
Linda C.
Virginia

add your own comments


 
Medical Abuse at Prisons (english)
by Dee Moore 10:30am Wed Jan 17 '01
Moorekedee@aol.com

I was deeply concerned after hearing about the deaths of 3 women at Chowchilla State Prison. It seems like these people are treated differenty than someone "outside" would be treated in the same circumstances.
Something needs to be done to help find out the "real story".
Every family who has someone in one of our state prisons should be concerned and voicing their opinion to their state representatives and Govenor Gray Davis, who seems to be more on the side of the "Prison Guard Association" than he is for helping the people who are treated unjustly inside the prisons.
Also, if the "media" was allowed access to the prisoners, maybe this wouldn't have happened. It sounds like the injustices are being hidden by the large and powerful prison system
Dee Moore

add your own comments


 
Medical Abuse at Prisons (english)
by Dee Moore 10:30am Wed Jan 17 '01
Moorekedee@aol.com

I was deeply concerned after hearing about the deaths of 3 women at Chowchilla State Prison. It seems like these people are treated differenty than someone "outside" would be treated in the same circumstances.
Something needs to be done to help find out the "real story".
Every family who has someone in one of our state prisons should be concerned and voicing their opinion to their state representatives and Govenor Gray Davis, who seems to be more on the side of the "Prison Guard Association" than he is for helping the people who are treated unjustly inside the prisons.
Also, if the "media" was allowed access to the prisoners, maybe this wouldn't have happened. It sounds like the injustices are being hidden by the large and powerful prison system
Dee Moore

add your own comments


 
Medical Abuse at Prisons (english)
by Dee Moore 10:31am Wed Jan 17 '01
Moorekedee@aol.com

I was deeply concerned after hearing about the deaths of 3 women at Chowchilla State Prison. It seems like these people are treated differenty than someone "outside" would be treated in the same circumstances.
Something needs to be done to help find out the "real story".
Every family who has someone in one of our state prisons should be concerned and voicing their opinion to their state representatives and Govenor Gray Davis, who seems to be more on the side of the "Prison Guard Association" than he is for helping the people who are treated unjustly inside the prisons.
Also, if the "media" was allowed access to the prisoners, maybe this wouldn't have happened. It sounds like the injustices are being hidden by the large and powerful prison system
Dee Moore

add your own comments


 


1